HARRISBURG — Pennsylvania is acting to enable retired health care professionals to assist with the COVID-19 response by waiving certain licensing regulations.

Previously, the Department of State waived some regulations for nurses, removed barriers for pharmacies to provide services, and announced that in-state and out-of-state health care practitioners can treat patients via telemedicine during the coronavirus emergency.

The Department of State’s Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs requested, and Governor Wolf granted, suspensions of several regulations related to the state boards of Medicine, Osteopathic Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy for the duration of the coronavirus emergency. A previous suspension allows for retired nurse-midwife license reactivations.

These new regulation suspensions increase the number of available and qualified health care practitioners in Pennsylvania by allowing retired practitioners to re-enter their field more easily without paying reactivation fees.

  • State Board of Medicine licensees who are in active/retired status for less than four years can apply for reactivation of their license.
  • Medical Doctors and certain allied health professionals integral to providing care during this state of emergency, whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than four years, may apply for reactivation of their licenses.
  • State Board of Osteopathic Medicine licensees who are in active/retired status for less than four years can apply for reactivation of their licenses.
  • DOs and certain allied health professionals integral to providing care during this state of emergency, whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than four years, can apply for reactivation of their licenses.
  • Registered Nurses, Clinical Nurse Specialists, and Certified Registered Nurse Practitioners whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than five years can apply for reactivation of their licenses.
  • Pharmacists whose licenses are expired/inactive for less than four years can apply for reactivation of their licenses.

Last week, BPOA announced that in-state and out-of-state health care practitioners can treat patients via telemedicine during the coronavirus emergency.